Monday, April 14, 2014

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Dear Juniors,
 We discussed Chapters 1-3 of The Great Gatsby. Students were then assigned an interpretive analysis regarding what each party scene illustrates regarding characterization. I wrote the introductory paragraph for the class.

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s, The Great Gatsby,  superficially focuses on the twisted love between Jay Gatsby and D.  B. The main theme of the novel; however, pertains to a much larger and less romantic scope. The novel’s primary theme involves the disintegration of the American dream and the lack of moral fortitude found within the novel’s primary characters. This moral decay becomes evident as Fitzgerald portrays his characters in a myriad of different party scenes; depicting their deplorable and degrading moral standards. 

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

February 19th, 2014

Dear Juniors,
If you missed class today, we completed the following:

1. Each student was given a copy of the following poems, "Out, Out" by Robert Frost and "To a Friend Whose Work has come to Triumph" by Anne Sexton. We then discussed the allusions  to both pieces of work. The first poem relates to a mythological character named Icarus, and the second allusions relates to MacBeth. We then went through each poem and used the TPFASTT method to help in identifying the poet's intent. Visit with a friend from class, if you need assistance.

To a Friend whose work has come to Triumph by Anne Sexton

Consider Icarus, pasting those sticky wings on,
testing that strange little tug at his shoulder blade,
and think of that first flawless moment over the lawn
of the labyrinth. Think of the difference it made!
There below are the trees, as awkward as camels;
and here are the shocked starlings pumping past
and think of innocent Icarus who is doing quite well.
Larger than a sail, over the fog and the blast
of the plushy ocean, he goes. Admire his wings!
Feel the fire at his neck and see how casually
he glances up and is caught, wondrously tunneling
into that hot eye. Who cares that he fell back to the sea?
See him acclaiming the sun and come plunging down
while his sensible daddy goes straight into town.

“Out, Out” by Robert Frost

The buzz-saw snarled and rattled in the yard
And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,
Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.
And from there those that lifted eyes could count
Five mountain ranges one behind the other
Under the sunset far into Vermont.
And the saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled,
As it ran light, or had to bear a load.
And nothing happened: day was all but done.
Call it a day, I wish they might have said
To please the boy by giving him the half hour
That a boy counts so much when saved from work.
His sister stood beside them in her apron
To tell them "Supper." At the word, the saw,
As if to prove saws knew what supper meant,
Leaped out at the boy's hand, or seemed to leap—
He must have given the hand. However it was,
Neither refused the meeting. But the hand!
The boy's first outcry was a rueful laugh,
As he swung toward them holding up the hand
Half in appeal, but half as if to keep
The life from spilling. Then the boy saw all—
Since he was old enough to know, big boy
Doing a man's work, though a child at heart—
He saw all spoiled. "Don't let him cut my hand off—
The doctor, when he comes. Don't let him, sister!"
So. But the hand was gone already.
The doctor put him in the dark of ether.
He lay and puffed his lips out with his breath.
And then—the watcher at his pulse took fright.
No one believed. They listened at his heart.
Little—less—nothing!—and that ended it.
No more to build on there. And they, since they
Were not the one dead, turned to their affairs.

1. Please read Chapters 9 and 10 of TEWWG! 
Notate for the following:

  • Identify how Janie is different in Chapter 10 in comparison to 9.
  • Identify the difference between how TeaCake treats Janie and how Jody treats Janie.
  • Your "Out, Out" poem is due on Tuesday, the 25th!